Art exhibitions in Paris at the moment
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Art exhibitions in Paris at the moment

Art exhibitions in Paris at the moment

There are a lot of art exhibitions in Paris these days.

If you’re a fan of contemporary art, you’re probably on the lookout for great exhibitions, whether in museums or galleries, to (re)discover the work of talented artists past and present. From renowned talents to rising stars and lesser-known artists, we present here a selection of beautiful exhibitions to satisfy your cultural desires.

Temporary exhibitions came into being with the emergence of the emblematic figures of collectors in the 15th century, followed by art dealers. In the 18th century, the Académie Royale des Beaux-Arts took over France and England. However, it was only with the advent of modernity and the rise of the avant-garde that temporary exhibitions became widespread, notably with the multiplication of salons and the opening of galleries. From 1947 onwards, this movement continued to intensify, reaching the rotation frequencies we know today.

Painting, sculpture, photography, contemporary art, architecture, design… L’Officiel des Spectacles is a reference guide to current exhibitions in Paris and the surrounding region. Find all the exhibitions in Paris museums, art galleries and cultural centers.

The two current exhibitions:

Années 80″ exhibition at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs.

The Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris puts the spotlight on France in the 1980s. He sets up a major exhibition, as the museum knows how to do, bringing in all his know-how and his collection of works and objects from the period. The 1980s, from the election of François Mitterrand in 1981 to the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, were a political and artistic turning point for fashion, design and graphics. Posters, photographs, music videos, record sleeves, fanzines… Over 700 works to discover. They are the symbol of that ebullient era, synonymous with eclecticism, when postmodernism opened up all artistic possibilities.

A decade, not decadent but historic, that saw the emergence of a new generation of designers in a context that encouraged freedom of expression: Olivier Gagnère, Elizabeth Garouste and Mattia Bonetti, Philippe Starck, Martin Szekely…. I remember it like it was yesterday, a veritable frenzy of creation, a new world opening up to us. Creations have also freed themselves from stylistic specifications, and some fashion designers, such as Jean Paul Gaultier and Thierry Mugler, have risen to the rank of “superstars”. Jean-Paul Goude, Jean-Baptiste Mondino and Etienne Robial are all in the advertising, graphic design and audiovisual fields. New wave music drooled over Formica transistors, post-punk flirted with hip-hop. The sound was pumping out decibels in the legendary venues frequented by partygoers from all over Paris.

Exhibition Paris: The 80s. Fashion, design, graphics in France

Dates : October 13, 2022 to April 16, 2023

Venue: Musée des Arts Décoratifs (MAD)

107 rue de Rivoli

75001 Paris

Opening hours :

– Tuesday to Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

– Closed on Mondays, December 25 and January 1.

HOW TO GET THERE

Metro: Palais Royal-Musée du Louvre (lines 1,7), Tuileries (line 1), Pyramides (lines 7, 14)

Bus: routes 21, 27, 39, 48, 68, 72, 81, 95

Parking: Carrousel du Louvre, rue des Pyramides.

RATES

Full price: €14

Exhibition(s) + collections (audioguide included)

Free for visitors under 26

BILLETTERIE

Reservations strongly recommended.

Buy your tickets online for the “80s” exhibition

https://billetterie.madparis.fr/activite/2607/

Chic, Decorative Arts and Furniture from the 1930s to the 1960s” exhibition.

The exhibition “Le Chic! Decorative arts and furniture from 1930 to 1960” is presented by Le Mobilier National de la Galerie des Gobelins.

The evolution of the decorative arts from the 1930s to the 1960s is presented in the form of an initiatory journey, a well-explained path that allows you to understand its evolution. The national furniture collection boasts around 200 pieces. Here, you can admire reconstructions of major furniture ensembles, such as the furnishings in the Hôtel Kinski, and even the sovereign’s apartments in the Château de Rambouillet.

The image of the decorator plays a major role, from the 1930s to the end of the 1950s. All the great decorators of the period, including André Arbus, Jules Leleu, Jean Pascaud, Étienne-Henri Martin, Marc du Plantier, Gilbert Poillerat and Raphaël Raffell, worked with Mobilier National. They helped shape the history of the last three decades of the 20th century of design.

Authentic architects in the construction of design, the “Art Deco” decorators created motifs and decorations, coordinating their know-how, always at the service of global projects. Refined art is based on both the preciousness of materials (parchment, gilded bronze, crystal, lacquer…) and the purity of design. The Mobilier National collection bears witness to this Art Deco era, and includes both ceremonial furniture, heir to a long tradition of luxury, and functionalist pieces, marking a turning point towards contemporary design.

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

Paris exhibition: Le chic! Decorative arts and furniture from 1930 to 1960.

Dates : October 12, 2022 to January 29, 2023

Location: Galerie des Gobelins

42 avenue des Gobelins

75013 Paris

Opening hours: Tuesday to Sunday, 11 am to 6 pm. Closed December 25 and January 1.

ACCESS

Metro: Les Gobelins (line 7)

Bus: Lines 27, 47, 83, 91

RATES

Full price: 8 euros

Reduced rate: 6 euros

Free for children under 12

Web link :

http://www.mobiliernational.culture.gouv.fr/fr/expositions-et-evenements/le-chic-arts-decoratifs-et-mobilier-de-1930-a-1960

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